Thursday, December 6, 2007

Bloof Books grand opening specials

+
2 for $25: Drunk by Noon by Jennifer L. Knox & For Girls (& Others) by Shanna Compton
($30.88 including Priority Shipping)



















+
2 for $25: Drunk by Noon & A Gringo Like Me by Jennifer L. Knox
($30.88 including Priority Shipping)



















DRUNK BY NOON by Jennifer L. Knox
POETRY, Trade Paper Original
ISBN: 978-0-6151-6355-0
80 pp. | $15.00

Did somebody say Jennifer L. Knox's poems "read like Richard Pryor with an MFA"? Yes, somebody did. (It was John Findura in Verse.) She's also been compared to comedian Sarah Silverman, artist Jeff Koons, a 10-year-old who can't keep her mouth shut, and cartoonist R. Crumb. None of these equations is quite right, however. Jennifer L. Knox's work is unmistakably her own: darkly hilarious, surprisingly empathetic, utterly original. DRUNK BY NOON is the eagerly awaited sequel to Knox's first book, A Gringo Like Me, which is also available from Bloof in a new edition. Visit the Bloof site for more info or to purchase separately.

****

FOR GIRLS (& OTHERS) by Shanna Compton
POETRY, Trade Paper Original
ISBN: 978-0-6151-6697-1
80 pp. | $15.00

In her second collection, Shanna Compton leads readers on a lightly satirical tour through various works of advice for young women, including antique etiquette manuals, 19th-century sermons, pseudoscientific physiology textbooks, newspaper clippings, and the Internet. Counseling girls on everything from fashion to family, the multiple personae in FOR GIRLS (& OTHERS) clamour to convey their contradictory (and often ridiculous) wisdom, as their polyvocal cacophony pitches toward hysterical heights. Visit the Bloof site for more info or to purchase separately.


****

BACK IN PRINT!
A GRINGO LIKE ME by Jennifer L. Knox
November 2007
Trade Paper, Second Edition
ISBN: 978-0-6151-6144-0
80 pp. | $15.00

Borrowing its title from an Ennio Morricone ditty in the spaghetti western Gunfight at Red Sands, Jennifer L. Knox’s A Gringo Like Me contains poems at once raucous and sexy, tender and high. In favorites such as “Hot Ass Poem,” “Cruising for Prostitutes,” and “Chicken Bucket,” Knox’s speakers appear ornery, hickish, undereducated, misogynist, or worse, but each quirky character manages to elucidate a truth we’re better off knowing, even if we’d rather forget it. At other times, Knox’s lyrical “I” is downright pretty; in poems like “A Common American Name” and “Freckles” she charms. Knox has collected dramatic monologues, personal lyrics, and even plays together in a single energetic volume for a genuinely surprising debut. Between the poles of her unique range, Knox straddles and tames what she may yet prove to be an artificial divide in American poetry: she’s a former slam champion, but also a three-time contributor to The Best American Poetry; she’s hilarious and performative on stage, but also deeply intellectual and formally in control. In A Gringo Like Me, Knox roughrides her muse at full gallop, shouting obscene slogans, bits of jokes, and sweet nothings at the top of her lungs along the way.

No comments: